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  • According to research conducted by the automotive shopping site, Carparts4less.co.uk, 51% of British workers spend more than an hour each day travelling to and from work, and 10% of these people pay £90 to £100 per month to commute. Those that travel to work using the underground system have the worst commuting experience. According to the research, 35% of people using the tube spend at least 75 minutes each day traveling to work and that doesn’t take into account any time that might be spent waiting to board the tube, in the worst cases people can spend as long as 60 minutes each day waiting on the platform.

    Those that use over-ground trains to commute

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  • The Government is planning to make all cars over 40 years old exempt from the MoT test. This would mean that almost 300,000 drivers would be driving cars that were MoT exempt as well as VED exempt. At the moment MoT exemption only applies to cars that were registered before 1960 which means that around 200,000 cars are currently MoT exempt.

    The government’s reasons for introducing these plans are that cars of this age are usually kept in good condition and used quite rarely and that the modern MoT is no longer applicable to cars that are over 40 years old, therefore garages are not able to test them properly.

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  • The William Merritt Centre is proud to announce the details of their annual assistive technology exhibition, AccessAbility. The exhibition showcases a wide variety of accessibility products and there will be experts on hand to provide advice to both disabled adults and children.

    New to this year’s event there will be an area dedicated to accessible gaming which will showcase a number of accessibility aids designed to help disabled people enjoy video games, toys and access computers. There will also be a Boccia court available so that those who want to can try out the sport. On a more serious note, there will be a car safety specialist on hand at this year’s

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  • A number of road safety charities are now asking mobile phone manufacturers to ensure that their phones have a safe driving mode which disables all calls and texts while people are driving. The campaign was started by the RAC Foundation and, so far, it has been supported by the road safety charity, Brake which has recently launched, Be Phone Smart. Brake has written to several mobile phone companies including Android and Microsoft and it has also written to the Groupe Speciale Mobile Association, a body which supports mobile operators worldwide, to ask them to support the campaign. The Director of Campaigns at Brake, Jason Wakefield said: “As a society, we have become addicted

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  • According to research carried out by the motoring experts, HPI, the average person changes their car more often than they change their phone. With more and more motorists choosing to lease their cars through a dealer rather than buy them, manufacturers are seeing their cars returned after an average of 18 months whereas the average person upgrades their phone every 24 to 36 months. HPI’s figures suggest that 80% of cars are now obtained on finance rather than purchased outright and considering that some cars are now available this way for as little as £99 per month, they are no longer considered to be such a big financial commitment. HPI’s Used Car Specialist,

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  • An estimated 3 million motorists are overspending by £800 million collectively by allowing their car insurance to renew automatically without making sure they are getting the best rate possible. According to GoCompare’s research one in six motorists let their insurance cover continue into the next year without making sure that they have been offered a competitive rate by their provider.

    Despite the introduction of new laws which mean that insurers must inform customers of last year’s rate when they renew and advise them that they are free to shop around for a better deal, only 40% of the motorists

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  • A common problem for many disabled motorists is not being able to park at their desired destination, especially at their local supermarket. The major complaint is that the disabled bays are all occupied with cars not displaying a Blue Badge.

    Disabled Motoring UK first launched its Baywatch Campaign in 2002. This campaign researches the level of disabled parking abuse at supermarkets, by asking disabled motorists to survey their local supermarket car park. Specifically, they count how many disabled bays are provided and how many cars that are parked in them without displaying a Blue Badge. The other information we ask for is details of the type of enforcement (if any) carried

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  • According to a survey conducted by the vehicle valuation company, Venson Automotive Solutions, the majority of motorists (69%) do not know that the minimum legal tread depth for the tyres on a vehicle is 1.6mm. At the moment, illegal tyres are a contributing factor in 40% of all UK road traffic accidents. Despite this statistic, the company’s survey also revealed that 31% of motorists do not take the time to check the condition of their tyres and assume that their car’s MoT or service will bring any tyre issues to light. When it comes to the correct procedures, only 4% of the respondents were able to say that they check their tyre tread depth once a week. Tyre pressure

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  • Since the Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) conducted its first review of disabled assistance at airports in 2015 a number of airports have made improvements to their assistance procedures, but there are still four major airports which according to the CAA, provide a poor quality of disabled assistance. Manchester airport, Exeter, East Midlands and Heathrow airport have all been criticised for not making improvements to their accessibility and the airports at Manchester, Exeter and the East Midlands have received further criticism in the CAA’s report for not conducting any consultations into the quality of their ‘special assistance’ which includes disabled

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  • New research conducted by the AA reveals that drivers who use motorway service stations to refuel their cars could potentially have to pay an extra 24p per litre compared to supermarket fuel prices. Motorway service petrol stations are charging as much as 131.9p per litre while the fuel prices at some supermarket petrol stations is as low as 107.7p per litre.

    The AA’s research also showed that fuel prices can vary from place to place making it somewhat of a postcode lottery. The petrol stations on some busy duel carriageways, for example, are charging 117.9 per a litre when the UK average is 116.5p. The

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